Metaphysical Dreamer

Simon R. Lopez (Left) with son, Simon A. Lopez Jr. (right)

My father died over two years ago and I have had at least two vivid dreams with him in it. In both cases the dream did not feel like the typical run of the mill dream.

Instead the dream had a kind of hyper-real intensity to it. I felt that I had been touched or visited or communicated with. I could not easily shake the conviction that my father had communicated with me from beyond the grave. So much so that I lit a Saint Miguel Arcangel candle, prayed on his rosary and cried to him for a little while. Now if I, an individual with a skeptical scientific cast of mind, could not shake the conviction that I had just communicated with my dead parent, how much stronger must be the conviction of someone with a less skeptical approach to dreams than me?

In this blog, I have an urge to argue that these sorts of dreams might be one source of the widespread belief in life after death—a core idea for conceptions of the soul and religion. For traditional people who accorded equal or greater ontological weight to dreams as compared to waking reality, must have been utterly convincing evidence that a spirit world and life beyond the grave existed.

Even in modernized societies, these kind of things can leave a considerable impact on the bereaved. Many bereaved people report that these sorts of dreams allowed for successful resolution for the grieving process. But will I get that resolution?

How many people and what kind of people actually report these dreams? Do they occur shortly after death of a loved one or can it happen years afterward? As is the case here. What kinds of effects do they have on emotional life of the dreamer? Unfortunately we don’t yet have reliable answers to any of these questions.

My father appeared as he did in life rather than as he did when he fell ill. In fact, he often appeared much younger or more healthy than when he died. Wearing a New York Yankees sweater (Sorry, Mets fans), he conveyed reassurance to me, the dreamer. “I am OK and still with you” This message tended to be conveyed telepathically or mentally rather than via spoken word. The dream structure was NOT disorganized or bizarre. So don’t jump ship just yet and assume that I have lost my mind. Instead this was typically clear, vivid, intense and experienced as a real visit once I awakened. Any time these dreams occur, I feel more and more changed by the experience. There is resolution of the grieving process and a wider spiritual perspective.

But I’ve always believed that spirits who go unheard for a very long time can create disruptions in homes and families until they are heard. So could this have been the case? Unlike the movie COCO, my father didn’t pass away with a fan base that will frame his picture on the day of the dead every year. Which can explain a lot of things. Have my recent life occurrences been much more difficult to cope with because I have somewhat forgotten my father?

Wrong. He is indirectly part of my brain’s engine. He’s my angel that symbolizes a greater force that is watching over me, directing me, sheltering me, or trying to show me something important, which is hidden. The important part about accepting this, is in translating the message within, based on what is currently happening in our spiritual and physical life.

For many, just to see a loved-one again is incredibly comforting. When you couple that with the ability to actually communicate with the departed, it provides a gift for the grieving that is beyond measure. One thing is certain. Through this belief, we gain hope. We gain solace, and spiritual strength.

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